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Beginner Saltwater Questions and comments for the new saltwater aquarist.

 
 
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  #11  
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Dano Dano is offline
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Default Re: Big tank, big problem!

You can clip the lower movable part of the big claws or you can put a rubber band on the claws. Every time the lobster moults you have to clip the claws again. They can eat with the smaller mandibles as usual. I have kept smaller varieties of crabs and gave them up because they ate my corals and starfish and they were less than two inches in diameter. The outlet pipe may not leach out copper, but you can coat it with a good swimming pool pant or marine boat enamel if you can get it dry enough to paint and cure. Macro algae is very large algae such a kelp. There are few actual marine plants. If you have anything that is green and leafy in the local water it is more than likely a macro algae. Real plants would be good in the tank also. Google Macro algae. There are in line skimmers and I think they may not be hard to make. I'll look into this and get back to you. You are not getting deaths because the large volume of water is acting as a buffer. As you increase the bio load problems may start so it is wise to monitor the tank conditions.
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louphoenix louphoenix is offline
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Default Re: Big tank, big problem!

There are 2 things algae need to survive: food and light. Cut out either one and you'll have an easier time getting rid of the algae.

Since you don't have a protein skimmer to remove excess nutrients in the water column, you may have to resort to cutting off the lights. It appears that the only photosynthetic creature you have in the tank are the anemones, but they should be fine if you don't over due it with the darkness.

Once upon a time, I had to deal with hair algae in my reef tank, which was annoying and hard to get rid of, so I tried the 'darkness' method. In a tank your size it may be a bit of an undertaking, but it can be done.
First, cut off all (and I mean ALL) sources of light, specially natural sources (like sunlight coming in from a window or doorway)...the easiest way to do this is by wrapping up the tank with black garbage bags (that's what I did) and turn all the lights off. Leave your filters and pumps running, as a matter of fact, try to increase circulation to help dislodge and remove the dying algae. Having sensitive corals in my tank, I only kept the lights off for 3 days and it worked well. There was massive algae die off... which means additional pollution in your tank. As soon as you're done with the darkness process, you MUST do a major water change to further remove the die-off.

I would also recommend that you minimize your feedings as much as possible, get algae consuming creatures (Snails, urchins, sea hares and certain blennies do this very well - do some online research), and last but not least, reduce or eliminate phosphates in your tank! I would recommend getting a phoban reactor, very cheap -$30 bucks- and you'll need a small pump and phos-ban media (easily found at any marine aquarium store), and you'll be doing yourself a big favor in means of algae reduction.

Hope this helps...
  #13  
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Default Re: Big tank, big problem!

[quote=Dano;19992]I The brown algae which isn't actually a plant won't be affected by light one way or another. If you have local macro algae, it would be a good addition to the tank. - [quote] Dano

There seems to be a slight disagreement regarding light - dont want to start any fisticufs. What is this brown algae if it is not a plant?

[quote =louphoenix Once upon a time, I had to deal with hair algae in my reef tank, which was annoying and hard to get rid of, so I tried the 'darkness' method. ]
I Dont think this is hair algae in my tank?? Piccie below? and what is a phoban reactor?????? Sounds very dramatic!
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  #14  
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Default Re: Big tank, big problem!

Read this on diatoms.http://www.microscopy-uk.org.uk/mag/...all/diadr.html

There is some debate of light effect on diatoms. I and others have had no luck in getting rid of it by light reduction. When the nitrate, phosphate, and silicate levels are reduced the brown algae dies off irregardless of the light. I notice that there is plain green algae and what appears to be Red Cyanobacteria growing with the BA on the glass. Look up Cyanobacteria. It is very difficult to eradicate. I think you are in for a battle with the natural light exposure you have. As food for thought: may be a translucent blue or green plastic film on the back of the tank might filter the hard light and still illuminate the tanks contents.
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  #15  
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Default Re: Big tank, big problem!

Dano and louphoenix. Thanks for all the info. There is a lot of 'stuff' there to digest and research. The phosban reactor sounds really good but afraid in the uk beyond my budget at the moment.

It's great to be able to get solid, sensible advice - thank you.
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Default Re: Big tank, big problem!

Hi fairbs

I have been reading the posts with great interest. I can't believe this project is finally coming into fruition. Looks like you have great advice to hand.

A few years ago we went into the sealife centre at St. Andrews, the diverse group of aquatic sea creatures there really entertained the children. I wonder whether if, you emailed them, they might be able to give you some ideas -you never know - they may be able to solve a query or two as well.

The tank looks great, so with all the problems behind the scenes, it certainly doesn't notice.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Michelle
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  #17  
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Default Re: Big tank, big problem!

Big problem gone! Found a plastic sort of windscreen ice remover in local shop here. Tried it gently then a bit firmer and with perseverance it removed algae/whatever and has not scratched the acrylic. Cleaned all filters today, did water change (Takes about 3 hrs!!!). So now tank looks great and it will just be a matter of keeping all going through winter months.
Thanks all for your help
  #18  
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Default Re: Big tank, big problem!

Very good. Please keep us posted with anything and everything.
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